80.6 F
Toledo
Thursday, July 18, 2019
Home Events Page 3

Events

A King’s first Queen hosted by MLK Academy for Boys

A King’s first Queen hosted by MLK Academy for Boys
LaTasha Poole and her son Marvell Curtis boogie on down the Soul Train line. Marvell began reminding his mother, regularly, one month prior to the event.

By Jurry Taalib-Deen
Journal Staff Writer

Heading into the week of the Third Annual Mother/Son Dance, with the theme, ”A King’s first Queen,” which was held on Friday, May 11, at Martin Luther King Academy for Boys, 1300 Forest Avenue, the halls, and classrooms were filled with chatter about the upcoming dance. Overly excited boys constantly talked about what they and their mothers were going to wear, according to Sheila Cook, planner of the event, and community family resource coordinator, at the school.

Willie Ward, left, principal, and William White, assistant principal, show the boys they still know how to dance.

As the mothers were escorted in by their kings, both walked down a red carpet leading into the gymnasium, where the event was being held. And similar to red carpet events in Hollywood, both had the opportunity to pose for the paparazzi’s pictures.

The king, and his first queen, would do line and slow dances, as well as the always popular party favorite Soul Train line, before finally sitting down to a catered dinner by J’Maes Home Cooking.

A King’s first Queen hosted by MLK Academy for Boys
Lanette Peacock, and her son William, show off their dance moves. Ms. Peacock said going into the event, her son wouldn’t stop talking about it.

Ms. Cook told The Toledo Journal that since the school was for boys, it would be a good idea to have a mother/son dance. And since it was two days before Mother’s Day, it would also be a good idea to serve dinner; a type of early Mother’s Day gift, Ms. Cook said.

Lanette Peacock was with her son William. She also has two girls, and doesn’t get to spend as much time as she would like with William.

“This is so awesome,” she said. I really love attending this event with him. All week, he was so excited about it, and kept constantly reminding me about the dance. As long as he’s attending, we will be coming,” Ms. Peacock said.

A King’s first Queen hosted by MLK Academy for Boys
A total of 140 kings, and their first queens were in attendance; a number that grows yearly.

LaTasha Poole was with her son Marvell Curtis. She said he started talking about the dance a month ago, and didn’t stop reminding her about the event.

“I love it,” she said. “We come every year, and it gets better and better,” Ms. Poole said.

Willie Ward, principal, said, “The moms are always there for their sons to help with their education, and just to love them; so tonight is for both the moms and their sons. Here, at Martin Luther King Academy for Boys, one of our objectives is to teach the boys how to treat, and respect a woman,” he said.

Center for Hope hosts Family Engagement Picnic

0
Center for Hope | The Toledo Journal
officials of the court played games of Corn Hole with the children.

By Journal Staff Writer

Walbridge Park, located on S. Broadway, overlooks the Maumee River. The park has swings, and jungle gyms to keep kids entertained for hours.

An air conditioned shelter house, complete with a functional kitchen, provides that escape from the heat, rain, and annoying bugs.

A mild temperature on Saturday, August 11 was perfect for an outing. But the particular outing wasn’t the typical group. Those attending the picnic were officials of the Lucas County Juvenile Court, as well as, the parents, and their children, some of whom are currently involved in the court system.

Center for Hope | The Toledo Journal
Shiloh Bass adjusts the bubble machine, while Ireese and Jaleel Gaines, and Tyrelle Broadnax make and blow bubbles.

The gathering was about building bonds with the families and children, involved in the system, as well as, those officials who work in the court.

Center for Hope | The Toledo JournalAlso, the picnic connects parents with others, who are dealing with similar circumstances, to serve as a type of support group.

Free food, games, and a live band help add more serenity, to an already, peaceful environment.

Sponsoring the event was Center for Hope. Dr. Tracee Perryman, CEO, and her mother, Wiletta Perryman, COO, planned the event. Dr. Perryman told The Toledo Journal that the picnic helps build bridges between officials of the court, as well as families. The festive environment helps establish better communications between all parties, that will ultimately, help lead to a potentially better outcome for the families.

Center for Hope | The Toledo Journal

Denise Navarre Cubbon, administrative judge at Lucas Juvenile Court, was also in attendance. She engaged many of the families in, one on one, conversation.

“This is one of the most important things the court does,” she said. “We bring the families together, and help them to help their kids make positive changes, in their lives, for the better,” said Judge Cubbon.

Ernest Sanders was enjoying the picnic with his children. “I think this is a good event. It really gives the families and the court an opportunity to establish better communication with one another on how to resolve problems.”

Franklin Park spreads holiday cheer, gives coats, groceries and more

0
Franklin Park Holiday Coats The Toledo Journal

By Sean Stewart

A drive through the streets of Northside Toledo on Friday’s mild evening would have usually been like any other, dark and quiet. Though at Word of Faith Ministries on Stickney Ave near Woodward High school, the scene was brought up by a more energetic and cheerful tone.

Cars parked along the street are packed with youth, eager to join in on the affair. Though before they opened the doors to the church, on the corner of Stickney and Russell, they are greeted by a man and a dolly hand truck, packed with items halfway to its top.

The man says with a welcoming yet weighty voice, “watch yourself now, careful”.

The children obey as the man carries past. Though when they enter into the building, the darkness of daylight’s fall resides and the kids embrace the warmth of festivity.They are greeted by smiles, laughs and warmth. Also, by gifts.

Over 120 families gathered to receive donations of coats, gloves, and food boxes December 19th. It is a tradition that has been going on for seven years in which Franklin Park Lincoln car dealership has moved to provide a holiday contribution effort to the community.

Foods like potatoes, apples, whole turkeys and canned goods, along with newly bought winter clothing, were donated to families in need of assistance.

“We try to give back to the community” says event organizer Mike Colbert, who also works with Franklin Park Lincoln.

Families were also welcomed to a hot meal dinner courtesy of community volunteers. On the menu was a generous selection of well prepared chicken breast, fried potatoes, mashed potatoes and gravy, corn and more served with hot chocolate and tea.

“I just love to cook” said Martin McCabe, who cooked and prepared the hot food. He has been with Mr. Colbert in the annual event’s organization since the beginning. “Unfortunately the world’s gonna keep having poor people”.

Aside from the food and winter wear, local barbers and nail stylists also donated their time and skills for good measure. To the tunes of cheerful music, children were able to get their hair cut and shaped up on the church’s stage and nails polished just off to the side.

Franklin Park Holiday Coats The Toledo Journal

“Lots of people hurting” said Rodney Holmes, an elder at Word of Faith who volunteered to help. “This is a gift in and of itself, of giving back. They need help.” Mr. Holmes moves to serve his community in the way he can. As to the vision of Mr. Colbert of Franklin Park, he gives new winter coats to the families of the community, also food by the box.

He does it all with a hearty and welcoming, yet weighty voice. He also does with a dolly, packed halfway to its top.

Books 4 Buddies has give-away for students at LMHA Weiler Homes

0
Books 4 Buddies has give-away for students at LMHA Weiler Homes | The Toledo Journal
Ambassador, and spokesman for Books 4 Buddies, Mondo Arce, right, and Jordan Topoleski, read to the children.

By Jurry Taalib-Deen
Journal Staff Writer

“I don’t let me kids read from the internet, unless it’s school related. I want them reading from an actual book,” Maryah McIntosh told The Toledo Journal on Wednesday, July 25.

Ms. McIntosh was one of many parents, who attended Books 4 Buddies event, held at the Weiler Homes, on Toledo’s east side. Throughout the year, the organization hosts similar events around Toledo. The object is to encourage literacy through reading actual books. The event was a collaboration between Toledo Public Schools (TPS) and Lucas County Metropolitan Housing (LMHA).

Books 4 Buddies has give-away for students at LMHA Weiler Homes | The Toledo Journal
Leticia Bermejo said, “I want my son, Xavier Johnson, to love reading like I do. So I thought this event would be good to further encourage him.”

In addition to giving away books, free food, face painting, games, and a boxing lesson made up the day’s agenda.

Mondo Arce, 17, is the spokesperson, as well as an Ambassador for Books 4 Buddies.

“Events like this are so important,” he said. “When you read from a book, instead of your phone, you avoid distractions like texts messages, social media updates, etc. Although books may be considered old fashion, they still work. And it’s important that kids have role models encouraging, and showing them the importance of reading a book,” Mondo said.

Books 4 Buddies has give-away for students at LMHA Weiler Homes | The Toledo Journal
Dr. Romules Durant, superintendent for Toledo Public Schools, and Laneta Goings, founder/president of Books 4 Buddies discuss ways of encouraging children to read during the summer months.

Jordan Topoleski, 18, is also an Ambassador for Books 4 Buddies. He said that, many people may not have the resources to buy and keep books in their homes; therefore, their effort helps fill a much needed void.

“Over the years since I’ve been in the program, I’ve got a better perspective on the entire city, and not just where I live,” he said.

 

Books 4 Buddies has give-away for students at LMHA Weiler Homes | The Toledo Journal

Joaquin Centron Vega is vice president of assets management for LMHA. He said, “We like to take pride in our community by helping to provide positive things for it, especially for the children.”

“This event encourages kids to read during the summer months,” said Dr. Romules Durant, superintendent for TPS. “We’re always looking for ways to encourage literacy,” he said.

Third Baptist Church celebrates 150 years of service to God, community

0
Third Baptist Church celebrates 150 years | The Toledo Journal
From left, Pastor Willie Harper, keynote speaker, Rev. Dr. K. David Johnson, Rev. James Willis, senior pastor at St. Paul’s Missionary Baptist Church, Catherine Crosby, chief of staff for Mayor Wade Kapszukiewicz, and Tyrone Riley, Toledo City Council, District One.

By Journal Staff Writer

Since January, the members of Third Baptist Church have been commemorating their 150-year anniversary by hosting monthly events. The nearly year-long celebration came to an end during the weekend of November 10th and 11th when they hosted their anniversary banquet on Saturday evening at the Radisson Hotel at the University of Toledo, 3100 Glendale, and concluded with church service the following day, at their church, located at 402 Pinewood Ave.

Sirlema Crowley anniversary chairperson told The Toledo Journal that the banquet would feature musical selections by “Women of Genesis,” members of Third Baptist Church, and Debra Gardner, a member of St. Paul’s Missionary Baptist Church. Further, the keynote address would be delivered by Willie Harper, pastor of Jesus Christ for All Nations, located in Dublin, California. The former native of Toledo spoke on the topic of generational building.

Third Baptist Church celebrates 150 years | The Toledo Journal
Third Baptist’s ‘Women of Genesis’ performed during the banquet.

“It’s an honor to be the keynote speaker for a church that’s been around for 150 years,” said Pastor Harper. “When many churches fail within a few years, Third Baptist continues to shine throughout the city,” he said.

Third Baptist Church celebrates 150 years | The Toledo Journal“Third Baptist develops leaders for Toledo, and the rest of the United States,” said Rev. Dr. K. David Johnson, senior pastor at Third Baptist. “We have teachers, lawyers, doctors and other professionals that are members. That’s one of the things that distinguishes us from other churches; the fact we develop leadership for the country. This unique combination continues to make Third Baptist relevant in a time when other churches fall off,” he said.

Also, proclamations from the Mayor’s office, as well as, city council were presented.

As a member of 48 years, Ms. Crowley said it was an honor to serve as the chairperson. She described Third Baptist Church as a family. “We’re a very close to each other. The members are just like family,” she said.

Herbert Mickler, PAL baseball coach retires after 31 years of service

0
Herbert Mickler, PAL baseball coach retires | The Toledo Journal

By Jurry Taalib-Deen
Journal Staff Writer

During his 31-year tenure as the head coach of the Police Athletic League, PAL, Padres baseball team, Herb Mickler won 15 championships, including the 2017 championship in which his team went undefeated.

But on Saturday, August 5 at Gunckel Park, located on Division and Belmont, a retirement party was held for Coach Mickler; officially ending his 31-year career.

Not only were family members and former players in attendance, but Toledo city leaders including Mayor Paula Hicks-Hudson, and Councilman Larry Sykes.

Herbert Mickler, PAL baseball coach retires | The Toledo Journal

Valerie Hughley, Coach Mickler’s daughter, organized the event. “I’m giving my dad this party because he was not only a great man to me, and my two siblings, but to so many other kids in the city,” she told The Toledo Journal.

“I know this retirement is not the end,” said Tami Mickler, daughter. She said, when her father completes one job, he goes on to another.

Brett Revels has been Coach Mickler’s assistant for the past four years and will be taking over as head coach.

“I have big shoes to fill,” he said. But during the past four years, Coach Revels said he learned a lot from his mentor that will make the job go smoother.

“Coach Mickler taught me to have patience with the kids. Some of them come from totally different backgrounds then others, which requires more patients, was just one of the valuable lessons I learned from him,” Coach Revels said.

“This is overwhelming,” Coach Mickler said about the large turnout of people in attendance at his retirement party. “It makes me feel good seeing so many people here,” he said.

The former 1953, National Golden Gloves, Lightweight Champion, somewhat confirmed his daughter, Tami Mickler’s suspicion of not totally retiring.

Coach Mickler laughed and said, “I’m not going to totally stop helping kids. I’m going to still work with them and try to help them do well in life. There are too many kids out here that need help.”

Race for the Cure

0
Race for the Cure | The Toledo Journal

By Michelle Martin
Journal Staff Writer

One in eight women are affected by breast cancer and five of these affected women will pass away each week. African American women are also 40 percent more likely to die from breast cancer, according to the American Cancer Society.

Race for the Cure_Brown-Mickels Family | The Toledo Journal
Brown-Mickels Family

While these numbers may be frightening, there is still hope. Susan G. Komen of Northwest Ohio has donated over $17 million to breast cancer research and local services, providing for thousands of local women. Twenty five percent of the collected donations are donated to cancer research, while 75 percent supports breast cancer awareness and preparedness in Northwest Ohio.

Race for the Cure FI_Aerobic Exercise encouragement | The Toledo Journal
Aerobic Exercise encouragement with Erika White

Race for the Cure_Children of the community volunteer | The Toledo Journal
Children of the community volunteer during the event.

This year, thousands gathered at the 25th annual Toledo Race for the Cure Sept. 30 in downtown Toledo. The event is held to raise breast cancer awareness and to celebrate survivors.

The 2018 race specifically honored survivor Rena Raga and the memory of Kelli Andres, wife and mother, who passed away this year.

Race for the Cure | The Toledo JournalThe day’s events included a Kid Zone at Fifth Third Field, a Survivor Parade, and a survivor ribbon photo taken with a flying drone. New this year was a survivor’s trolley that transported those who could not participate in the race.

About 20,000 people came to walk, run, volunteer, or watch the race which continues to support the foundation’s $1 million fundraising goal each year.

That goal is well on its way to being reached, considering the 10,000 paid participants as well as a $55,000 donation from Ford Motor Company towards the continued research for the cure.

Pastor Melvin Barnes celebrates seventeenth Pastoral Anniversary

0
The Toledo Journal Greater Faith Fellowship
From left are Pastor Melvin, and his wife, and co-Pastor, Jeanette Barnes, and Robin Wilson, fiancée to Pastor Floyd Smith Jr. of Calvary Baptist Church.

By Journal Staff Writer

Greater Faith Fellowship Church, 1544 S. Byrne Rd, celebrated the anniversary of their Pastor, Melvin Barnes, as their leader of 17 years. Held on Sunday, May 27th, the milestone event featured local leaders delivering the Word of God, and given testimony about the character of Pastor Barnes.

Patrice Poellnitz, lead trustee, told The Toledo Journal the anniversary celebration started on May 20 when some of the members of Friendship Baptist Church attended the service, while their Pastor, Bishop Dwayne Tisdale, delivered the Word.

May 27th featured two services. Elder Stephen Bufford of Greater Faith Fellowship delivered the morning’s keynote address, while the afternoon service was conducted by Pastor Floyd Smith, Jr. of Calvary Baptist Church.

“Our theme is ‘honoring the leader that watches over our soul,’ and the success of our destiny comes from our Pastor,” Ms. Poellnitz said.

During Pastor Barnes’ 17 year tenor, Ms. Poellnitz said she has seen a tremendous growth in her spiritual development.

“Trust in God, and put Him first in your life, and you will see changes in your life,” she said.

“I’m speechless, and impressed,” Pastor Barnes said, regarding the work put into the celebration. “They put a lot of work into this event, with very little assistance from me,” he said.

Pastor Barnes said that although the congregation is young, they were able to successfully plan and execute the anniversary that people from much more experienced congregations, would be able to do, and that he said, made him proud of his members.

Greater Faith Fellowship Church’s future plans include reestablishing themselves in the inner city in order to better serve the community.

“By having a church, within the inner city, we’ll be able to be a bigger blessing to the community,” Pastor Barnes said.

Junior High Afro-Ball; a graduation into maturity

0
The Toledo Journal | Junior High Afro-Ball
Being sharply dressed didn’t stop, from left, Dmarea Rankin, Julius Akins, Jaylon Akins, and Damond Robinson from dancing.

By Jurry Taalib-Deen
Journal Staff Writer

Although at first glance, the 35th annual Junior High Afro-Ball may seem like it’s just a dance, but according to organizers, it’s much deeper than a dance; it’s a graduation into maturity.

Over 950 students throughout the Toledo Metropolitan Area, and representing Toledo Public Schools, Charter, and Parochial, attended the annual event held at the Seagate Convention Center in downtown Toledo, on Saturday, May 19. Themed, “The future belongs to those who prepare,” the ball was just the icing on the cake, with preparations beginning months in advance.

Junior High Afro-Ball

Weeks leading up to the ball, letters were sent out to area high schools asking the principals to nominate two students, who would represent their school, at the 2018 Afro-Ball. A total of 40 kids, from 20 different schools were then invited, along with their parents, to attend a banquet at Scott High School, days before the event. Students were celebrated for their character, and accomplishments. Both students, and parents were reminded that Grace Community Center, and their partners, wanted to work with the students the coming year, as well as throughout high school, in order to better prepare them for college, or being career ready. Then, while at the ball, those 40 students had a special VIP section reserved for them.

Junior High Afro-Ball
Dancing, centered, and facing each other are Danae Brown, with her back facing, and Mariah Searcy; Jada Willis, left, looks on.

Elaine Page, executive director of the Grace Community Center, which organizes the event, told The Toledo Journal, “Besides being a celebration of diversity, which we have diverse groups of students, in attendance, it’s also about togetherness,” she said.

Junior High Afro-Ball
Besides dancing, kids could play various games. Patrick Huggins, left, and Lonnie Williams play a game of Jenga.

Ms. Page added by saying that the more important part about the Afro-Ball comes when Grace Community Center, as well as their partners, pairing up with the schools, the principals, the teachers, students, and parents, to help them be better prepared for the future.

“Tonight is rites of passage,” she said. “The students are here, without their parents, and they have to make the right decisions, while here, without them. The correct decision making process will help them later on throughout school, and life,” Ms. Page said.

Junior High Afro-Ball
From left are, Bryce Harbaugh, chairman of Grace Community Center Board, Jay Shavers, youth director at Grace Community Center, and three Afro-Ball attendees, Carmello Taite, Moriah Robinson, and Reona Pryor-Allen, and Elaine Page, director of Grace Community Center.

Bryce Harbaugh, chairman of Grace Community Center’s Board said, “If we can get students to think it’s cool to be responsible, and mature, then we would’ve helped make a better person.”

Toledo Urban Federal Credit Union shows appreciation by honoring members from the community

0
Toledo Urban Federal Credit Union shows appreciation | The Toledo Journal
HONOREE'S LEFT TO RIGHT THOMAS STOVALL JR, JESSICA LaValley, WILLIAM RIDDLE, ANN

By Jurry Taalib-Deen
Journal Staff Writer

The staff of the Toledo Urban Federal Credit Union honored members from the community who’ve helped make the union a success during its 22 years of existence. That show of appreciation took place on Saturday, November 17 at the Pinnacle in Maumee, Ohio, at the Union’s Appreciation Banquet.

Toledo Urban Federal Credit Union shows appreciation | The Toledo Journal
FIRE CHIEF BRIAN BYRD SPEAKS TO AUDIENCE AFTER BEING AWARDED

Honored guests included Chief Brian Byrd, Toledo Fire Department, First lady Sheila Cook of New Life Church of God in Christ, Bernard ‘Pete’ Culp, retired school administrator, Jessica LaValley, nonprofit expert, Randy Oostra, chief executive officer of Promedica, Ann Riddle, executive director of Northwest Ohio Scholarship Fund, Celeste Smith, community and minority health supervisor at the Toledo-Lucas County Health Department, Michelle Fleetwood, wife to David Fleetwood, head of Local 500, and Tommy, and Tina Butts, business owners.

Toledo Urban Federal Credit Union shows appreciation | The Toledo Journal
SUZETTE COWELL CEO TUFCU

Suzette Cowell, President/CEO of Toledo Urban Federal Credit Union, told those in attendance that the honorees have helped make the union a success over the years, and felt it was necessary to publicly honor those individuals.

“I believe in giving people their flowers while they’re still alive,” she told her audience.

Ms. Cowell further shared the trials the union went through over the years, some of which, may seem hard to believe, she said.

Ms. Cowell spoke of the many obstacles that her, and the other founders had to go through to get established.  Closing down, and receiving bad press from Toledo’s daily newspaper, were just two obstacles the union faced during its infancy.

Toledo Urban Federal Credit Union shows appreciation | The Toledo Journal
R&B SOUL SINGER KEITH WASHINGTON

But it was the honorees that helped make the transition from infancy, to a fully established financial institute within the African American community.

Although it was the credit union honoring members of the community, the honorees quickly praised Ms. Cowell.

“The union is honoring us, but we should be honoring them,” Chief Byrd said. “They’re using their skills, and abilities to empower others who were blatantly denied by other financial institutes,” he said.

“After 22 years of existence, the Toledo Urban Federal Credit Union is proof that black businesses can survive, and thrive,” said Pete Culp.