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Geraldine Scrutchins given surprise birthday party

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Geraldine Scrutchins given surprise birthday party | The Toledo Journal
Ed and Geraldine Scrutchins, center, surrounded by a few family members and friends in attendance.

By Jurry Taalib-Deen
Journal Staff writer

Geraldine Scrutchins suspected her husband, Ed, was doing something special for her on her birthday, Wednesday, October 24, when he told her he was taking her out for barbeque. But what caused the suspicion was when he told her that needed to stop by Braden United Methodist Church, 4725 Dorr St. which she told The Toledo Journal, “We, at St. Paul AME Zion Church, rent out their facility for various occasions.”

It was her curiosity that caused her husband, of 49 years, to say, “Stop butting in, and let people do something for you.” Mrs. Scrutchins said she didn’t say another word, and just enjoyed the ride, and enjoyed arriving at the church being greeted by family, and friends.

Geraldine Scrutchins given surprise birthday party | The Toledo Journal
Ed Scrutchins surprised his wife, Geraldine with the party, even though her curiosity almost derailed the surprise.

Mr. Scutchins said, “She always helps others, and we wanted to do something for her.” His words about his wife would be a common theme echoed throughout the night by family, and friends.

“I remember when my wife was sick, and in the hospital, Geraldine would fix me dinners. I didn’t ask her to do it, she just did it and I really appreciate that gesture,” said Richard Earley, who was the best man at the Scrutchins wedding, 49 years ago.

“She kept me in line with discipline, and helped make me the man I am today,” said Scot, Mrs. Scrutchins’ son.

“She’s such a sweetheart. She opens herself up to help others, and today is our day to do something for her,” said Sean, Mrs. Scrutchins’ son.

Geraldine Scrutchins given surprise birthday party | The Toledo Journal
From left are, Sean Scrutchins, son, Betty Williams, sister, Geraldine Scrutchins, Scot Scrutchins, son, and Iyanna Scrutchins, granddaughter.

“I’m surprised this many people came out tonight,” said Mrs. Scrutchins, who took her time to greet, and thank everyone, who was in attendance. The secret to a good healthy, and vibrant life, she said, “Always be prayerful, and love, and care for others,” Mrs. Scrutchins said.

She added, “My husband is amazing. Tonight is beautiful. He never ceases to amaze me. I love him, my sons, and family, and I’m truly grateful for everyone attending tonight.”

John S. Scott playwright inducted in Toledo-Lucas County Public Library’s Toledoana Collection

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Dr. John Scott | The Toledo Journal

By Eddie B. Allen Jr.
Special to the Toledo Journal

When Toledo native John S. Scott looked out into the audience of the first New York play he’d written only six people stared back.

In some ways he was Tyler Perry decades before Tyler Perry came along, starting from an unlikely background and fueled by a love of storytelling – and a desire to create more provocative black characters than Madea.

Dr. John Scott | The Toledo Journal
Dr. Scott stands with his family (left to right) Niala Langster, Malaika Bell, Dr. Scott, Neema Bell and Jon’Jama Scott. Front center is Eisley Scott.

Today Scott, 81, is the newest inductee of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library’s Toledoana Collection. The former Bowling Green State University theater professor attended a Nov. 19 ceremony where several of his published works were accepted into the special division of Local History and Genealogy.

Scott, whose plays have attracted countless audience members since that first sparse crowd in New York, joked, “So I guess I’m coming up in the world.”

Dr. John Scott | The Toledo Journal
Clyde Scoles, Library Executive Director, Dr. John Scott and Jill Clever, library manager of local history and genealogy, stand together

Library officials including Director Clyde Scoles congratulated Scott before a crowd of about 50 family members, friends and colleagues at the Kent Branch for Scott’s success with scripts like Ride a Dark Horse. Scoles called it a special occasion “to honor a Northwest Ohio playwright,” given the library’s frequent recognition of nationally and internationally known authors.

Rhonda Sewell, external and governmental affairs manager for the library, recalled getting to know Scott when he gave her an adjunct position at Bowling Green State University where he chaired the ethnic studies program in the 1980’s.

“He is the most creative, intellectual person that I know,” Sewell told the audience.

Dr. John Scott | The Toledo Journal
(Left to right) Laneta Goings, Dr. Scott, Jill Clever, and Rhonda Sewell pause for a photo.
Dr. John Scott
Laneta Goings (left), president of Books4Buddies and Rhonda Sewell (right), Toledo Library Manager of External and Governmental affairs, speak at the induction.

District 4 Councilwoman Yvonne Harper was joined by District 1 Councilman Tyrone Riley and Council Member-at-large Larry Sykes in presenting Scott with a City of Toledo resolution.

Scott received additional praises and accolades from Books 4 Buddies co-founder Laneta Goings, program mentor Christopher L. Smith and Dorian Myers, a Books 4 Buddies youth ambassador. As part of Books 4 Buddies programming, Scott conducted the “Hook It Up” eight-week writing workshop for about 16 young men at the Birmingham Terrace homes this year.

Smith and Myers honored Scott with a presentation that included a Books 4 Buddies t-shirt.

Scott’s writings for the stage have featured performers who went on to become some of today’s most popular black actresses in television and film. Among Scott’s works included in the Toledoana Collection are: Afternoons at the A.O. Café, My Little Black Book: A Memoir, Shorty: Six One-Act Plays, and Lizard Therapy.

Along with his literary achievements, Scott carved out a successful career as a director and educator, teaching theater and fine arts at Bowling Green, Jackson State University, Florida Memorial College and other higher learning institutions.

He cited the famed novelist James Baldwin and an elementary school teacher who introduced him to classic literature as among his career influences. Being honored by friends and peers in his hometown is more humbling than other formal recognition, the past recipient of the Ohio Governor’s Award for the Arts told the audience.

“I guess I want to say that the poetry of the community is the best poem out there,” Scott said, “the very best.”

Woodward alumni awards scholarships to graduating seniors

Woodward alumni awards scholarships to graduating seniors
Receiving scholarships of $500 each, and standing with Woodward alumni are, standing center, JaRoya Ector, Shamar Williams, and Tayviauna Holmes.

By Journal Staff Writer

Woodward High School All-Class Reunion Committee and C.H. Barnett Construction awarded three scholarships to graduating high school seniors on Tuesday, May 8, at Woodward High School 701 E. Central Avenue. The awarding of the scholarships took place during the annual Senior Banquet.

The scholarships were awarded based on grades, and community, and school involvement, and valued at $500.00 each. The recipients were Tayviauna Holmes, Shamar Williams, and JaRoya Ecter.

Woodward alumni awards scholarships to graduating seniors
Woodward alumni awards scholarships to graduating seniors

Sheila Daniels-Bell is co-chair of the committee and a 1978 graduate. She told The Toledo Journal they just wanted to give back to the students of Woodward.

“Having scholarships for college is so important,” she said. “The money can go to books, living expenses, or whatever, but the money will make a difference,” Mrs. Daniels-Bell said.

Jeanne Cranon-Fuqua is the owner of C.H. Barnett Construction, as well as serving as the co-chair for the Woodward High School All-Class Committee. She is a 1977 graduate of Woodward High School. Her mom, aunt, and cousins attended Woodward. Two of the three scholarships are being sponsored by her construction company, that’s named after her grandfather.

“It’s an honor to be sponsoring the scholarships in my grandfather’s name. Although he didn’t attend Woodward, he grew up in the area and sent my mom and aunt to the school,” she explained.

“I didn’t know I was getting this scholarship,” Shamar said. “I’m shocked, and grateful.” He will be attending the University of Toledo majoring in music.

Tayviauna said she was happy, and thankful to receive money to go to her college education. She will be majoring in social work at the University of Toledo.

“I’m just really excited,” said JaRoya. She, too, will be attending the University of Toledo majoring in engineering.

The Woodward High School All-Class Reunion committee members are Sheila Daniels-Bell, Jeanne Cranon-Fuqua, Yvonne Harper, Margaret Wiggins, Marion Bell, Burrow Alexander III, Sharon McAlister-Collier, and Kimberly Dixon.

Dorr St. Live documenting, revitalizing the inner city

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Dorr St Live 2018 | The Toledo Journal
People brought their folding chairs, and just enjoyed the day’s festivities that carried on into the early evening.

By Journal Staff Writer

The fourth annual, Dorr St. Live was held on Saturday, August 25, at the corner of Dorr, and Collingwood. According to the sponsoring agent, the African American Legacy Project,  said it has a mission to document the history of the area, and help revitalize a once, financially lucrative community.

Local entertainment and some from out of town, kept a crowd that, brought their folding chairs to the event, and sat right in the grass, entertained throughout the day.

Dorr St Live 2018 | The Toledo Journal
Ronald Jacobs Bay, and Linda Johnson, didn’t know each other, but that didn’t stop them from sharing a dance together.

Food trucks, owned by African Americans, lined Dorr St. to satisfy the hunger needs of those in attendance.

Vendors selling products from fragrances, to unique purses were also on hand.

Dorr St Live 2018 | The Toledo Journal

A large wooden board sat in the middle of the grass, and was decorated with African American newspapers from far back as the 1940s.

For Robert Smith, director of the African American Legacy Project, this is all just the beginning of a larger scheme he wants to see come into existence.

“This event is not just about having a good time, it’s about documenting our rich history, and helping to revitalize this community,” he told The Toledo Journal.

Partnering with Lucas County Metropolitan Housing, LMHA, the African American Legacy Project, is documenting the life stories of some of those people who grew up in the neighboring housing projects of the Port Lawrence, Brand Whitlocks, McClinton Nuns, and Albertus Browns, and were successful in life.

People such as Frank Goldie, who grew up in the Port Lawrence, and became NW Ohio’s first African American Post Master General, would later become the Post Master General of Chicago.

Dorr St Live 2018 | The Toledo Journal
Liz Watson, volunteer, officiates a game of Connect Four between Mesih Glover, right, and Aaun Scott.

Katie Bonds, senior vice president of operations at LMHA said, “It’s important for Toledo to know their history. It’s also important for those who are growing up in those projects to know the success stories of those who came before them; it serves as inspiration.”

Sell Out Crowd of Over 750 Attended the Area Office on Aging’s Senior Holiday Party

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Billie Johnson and Mattie Taylor The Toledo Journal
Billie Johnson and Mattie Taylor

Submitted

Mattie Taylor is seen here with Ms. Billie Johnson, President/CEO of the  Area Office on Aging of Northwestern Ohio, Inc.

This was at their Senior Holiday Party on December 14 at Premier Banquet Center . And, they welcomed over 750 individuals age 60 or better.

Mattie Taylor retired in April, 2018, after 40 plus years, as a Nutrition Site Manager for The Area Office on Aging, and Spencer Valley Senior Nutrition Program.  Mattie Taylor states that, she enjoyed  the Christmas Party, and she will continue to attend all the events that the Area Office on Aging will have for the seniors. Everyone enjoyed a formal sit-down lunch, entertainment from singer Marcia Bowen, DJ One TyMe, the Anthony Wayne High School Choir, and, of course, a visit from Santa Claus.

Center of Hope Family Services Hosts its 2nd Annual Peace on Earth Event for the Community

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Center of Hope Family Services Hosts its 2nd Annual Peace on Earth Event thetoledojournal.com

Special to The Toledo Journal

On Thursday, December 20th, 2018, Center of Hope Family Services hosted its 2nd Annual Peace on Earth Holiday event. Sponsors included the William Vaughan Company, Apple Inc., and State Bank. “Peace on Earth is our way of letting families and the community know that we are thinking of them during the holidays,” states Dr. Tracee Perryman, CEO. “Our event is welcoming of diverse cultural holiday traditions, hoping that Peace on Earth is of value to all of us. The holiday season can be a joyous time, but it isn’t necessarily joyous for everyone. Each year, we at Center of Hope strive to bring the community together in unity and solidarity. We create a safe, supportive, warm, welcoming space to let our families and community know that we care about them.”

It seems that message is resonating with the community. The 2018 Peace on Earth attendance doubled from the year before, with about 300 guests partying to festive music. The Lucas County Juvenile Court Lobby was transformed into a “Winter Wonderland” to foster joy, hope, and holiday cheer. Children and families were able to participate in an array of activities. Lucas County Juvenile Court provided craft stations, cookie decorating, and an opportunity for each child to take pictures with Santa Claus. Center of Hope hosted a gift giveaway for all children ages 0-14.

Midway through the program, the crowd paused to honor seven of its Parent Support Program participants. These individuals were recognized for graduating from Center of Hope’s Parent Education Program during the month of December. Others were honored for maintaining employment for 90 days or more through Center of Hope’s workforce development program.

The Central Catholic High School Glee club provided live entertainment, followed by Dr. Tracee Perryman. The Center of Hope ELEVATE program, winners of both the 2018 Ohio Department of Education 21st Century Literacy Achievement, and Excellence and Innovation Awards, performed the finale. The ELEVATE students performed their signature song, “ELEVATE,” which they recorded this summer, and is now available on Soundcloud. Center of Hope concluded the program by sponsored a sit-down community dinner for all guests. For more information about Center of Hope Family Services or its programs, visit www.cohfs.org.