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United Missionary Baptist Church celebrates 35th anniversary

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United Missionary Baptist Church celebrates 35th anniversary | The Toledo Journal
The Anniversary Committee with, from left, guest speaker, Pastor Roderick Pounds, Rev. Robert Bass, senior pastor, and Julia Holt, founding member, and chairperson of the Trustee Board.

By Journal Staff Writer

For 35 years, the members of United Missionary Baptist Church, 2705 Monroe St, have been worshipping God, and inviting others to that worship. On Sunday, October 14, they celebrated their 35th anniversary by recognizing how far they’ve advanced as a congregation, and where they still, have yet to go.

Participating in the celebration were some of the members of Second Baptist Church in Akron, Ohio. Their Pastor, Roderick Pounds served as the keynote speaker.

Spearheading that celebration was Julia Holt, chairperson of the Trustee Board, and charter member of United Missionary Baptist Church. She told The Toledo Journal what keeps her actively involved at her church. “The members are very loving, and we work well together, plus, they have a genuine love for God,” she said.

As an extension to their anniversary celebration, the members hosted an afternoon fundraiser to further continue church renovations, as well as add to their scholarship fund, and continue their community outreach programs.

Entitled, “A Taste of Culture,” the fundraiser consisted of members of the church dividing up in four groups, with each group taking one of four regions, of the United States. The group then, preparde dishes that are indigenous to that particular region. Attendees would have the opportunity to taste those particular dishes. Further, each group would highlight the history of African Americans from that particular region of the country.

Rev. Robert Bass has been the head Pastor for 15 years. He said the anniversary celebration gives the members the opportunity to reflect on the challenges of the past 35 years, which helps them better map out, their future endeavors.

“One of the biggest obstacles we had to overcome is paying off a 30 year mortgage, in 16 years, with less people than we originally had,” he said. Rev. Bass said that being free of a mortgage, frees up the minds of the congregation, and puts them in a better position to focus on outreach programs, for example.

Rev. Bass further stated that, one of his short term objectives is having the church serve as a technological, and community focal point. “I want this church to be the center piece of the community, where people can come turn to, and get any kind of help they need,” he said.

Center of Hope Sponsors Event to Bring Awareness to Mass Incarceration

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Center of Hope sponsors event to bring awareness to mass incarceration | The Toledo Journal
Center of Hope honored individuals who work with the reentering society, as well as their families.

Submitted Article

During the weekend of October 5 through the 7, Center of Hope sponsored Healing Communities Weekend.

The event is designed to bring awareness to the problem of mass incarceration of people of color. It also mobilizes the faith based, community partners to develop and implement responsive initiatives to serve returning citizens and their families, as well as advocate for improved criminal justice policies at the legislative level.

Center of Hope sponsors event to bring awareness to mass incarceration | The Toledo Journal

On Friday, Center of Hope sponsored a Healing Communities workshop, which was led by Dr. Harold Dean Trulear. Dr. Trulear is an ordained American Baptist Minister who serves as Associate Professor of Applied Theology at Howard University. Further, he’s the director of the Healing Communities Prison Ministry and Prison Reentry Project of the Philadelphia Leadership Foundation.

Center of Hope sponsors event to bring awareness to mass incarceration | The Toledo Journal

Center of Hope sponsors event to bring awareness to mass incarceration | The Toledo Journal
Dr. Tracee Perryman played the organ, as Willie Knighten Jr., one of the honorees, sings.

The event concluded on Sunday with a worship service designed to facilitate healing, spiritual renewal, and hope for the future. Dr. Trulear was the morning speaker who spoke about the trauma and grief that returning citizens and their families face. “People will become mobilized to advocate for change when they acknowledge that the problem affects them personally,” he said.

The program concluded with fostering hope through acknowledging individuals who have championed re-entry community engagement service provision, criminal justice policy, and research. Those individuals were Willie Knighten Jr, for his work in behavioral health as a mentor and re-entry support specialist. Mr. Knighten also spent 13 years in prison before being exonerated by former Ohio Governor, Ted Strickland. Johnetta McCollough, executive director of Treatment Accountability for Safer Communities, TASC. She was recognized for her leadership in providing effective intervention services to high risk adult and juvenile offenders. Amy Priest, director of programs and services for the Mental Health and Recovery Services Board of Lucas County. She was recognized for spending half her life helping those individuals involved in the criminal justice system. Carol Contrada, Lucas County Commissioner was recognized for helping the county secure $1.75 million from the John D and Catherine T. McArthur Foundation’s Safety and Justice Challenge to reduce the jail population at the county level, while addressing racial and ethnic disparities. Judge Denise Navarre Cubbon was recognized for her work with the Annie E. Casey Foundation to reduce disparities for out of home placements among youth of color. Dr. Donald L. Perryman received the Criminal Justice Research Award for his dissertation on “The Role of the Black Church in Addressing the Collateral Damage of Mass Incarceration.” The work synthesizes the myriad of practical interventions that churches can utilize to impact the current and formerly incarcerated, their families, the surrounding communities, systems, and legislation.

 

Men of God standing up for Christ at third annual retreat

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Men of God standing up for Christ at third annual retreat | The Toledo Journal
Men of all ages participated in the retreat.

By Jurry Taalib-Deen
Journal Staff Writer

Men from three area churches, Calvary Missionary Baptist, United Missionary Baptist, and Shiloh Baptist participated in a two day retreat, and conference. The event was held on Friday and Saturday, October 5th and 6th, at the Holiday Inn French Quarter, 10630 Fremont Pike, in Perrysburg, Ohio.

With the theme, “Men standing up for Christ,” which was taken from Matthew 5: 13-16 of the Bible, attendees participated in interactive discussions on topics such as, “Let your light shine,” and “Make your calling and election sure.” Further, group prayer was held both days, there was entertainment by Darryl Earl, a comedian out of Detroit, Michigan, and Rev. Dr. Jerry Boose of Second Baptist Church, delivered the keynote address.

Men of God standing up for Christ at third annual retreat | The Toledo Journal
Darryl Earl, comedian from Detroit, Michigan, kept the men laughing with jokes about church life

Deacon Willie Tucker of Calvary Missionary Baptist Church, told The Toledo Journal the amount of men participating for the 2018 retreat had doubled from last year.

“This is an opportunity for men to come together to fellowship, and see how we can implement into the community, what we learn these two days.”

Rev. Troy Brown of United Missionary Baptist Church shared, “This is our second year, as a church, participating in the retreat. The men were really excited about attending.”

Rev. Avearn Ford of Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church added that, the young men, who participated in the retreat, gave tear jerking testimonies on how they need Christ in their life.

Men of God standing up for Christ at third annual retreat | The Toledo Journal
Committee members for the retreat are, from left, Rev. Troy Brown of United Missionary Baptist church, Deacon Troy Ogle of Calvary Missionary Baptist Church, Deacon Willie Tucker of Calvary Missionary Baptist Church, and Rev. Avearn Ford of Shiloh Baptist Church.

When it came time for Rev. Boose to deliver the keynote address, he told the men that he wanted to give them information that not only tied into the retreat, but could be utilized once they returned to their individual church, and surrounding community.

He asked them, “Do you know who you are? What’s your purpose with Christ? If you understand your purpose, you’ll get in the right position to cause change.”

Rev. Boose continued, “Religion is only mentioned twice in the Bible, but the word kingdom is throughout the book. God rules Heaven. We rule ourselves; the kingdom. And if you notice, kings are never in need within their kingdom. They’ve been given authority in the land, and we, as men, need to recognize we’re kings of our land, granted that authority, by God. When we truly believe we’ve been given that authority, our lives will begin to change for the better.”

Books 4 Buddies has give-away for students at LMHA Weiler Homes

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Books 4 Buddies has give-away for students at LMHA Weiler Homes | The Toledo Journal
Ambassador, and spokesman for Books 4 Buddies, Mondo Arce, right, and Jordan Topoleski, read to the children.

By Jurry Taalib-Deen
Journal Staff Writer

“I don’t let me kids read from the internet, unless it's school related. I want them reading from an actual book,” Maryah McIntosh told The Toledo Journal on Wednesday, July 25.

Ms. McIntosh was one of many parents, who attended Books 4 Buddies event, held at the Weiler Homes, on Toledo’s east side. Throughout the year, the organization hosts similar events around Toledo. The object is to encourage literacy through reading actual books. The event was a collaboration between Toledo Public Schools (TPS) and Lucas County Metropolitan Housing (LMHA).

Books 4 Buddies has give-away for students at LMHA Weiler Homes | The Toledo Journal
Leticia Bermejo said, “I want my son, Xavier Johnson, to love reading like I do. So I thought this event would be good to further encourage him.”

In addition to giving away books, free food, face painting, games, and a boxing lesson made up the day’s agenda.

Mondo Arce, 17, is the spokesperson, as well as an Ambassador for Books 4 Buddies.

“Events like this are so important,” he said. “When you read from a book, instead of your phone, you avoid distractions like texts messages, social media updates, etc. Although books may be considered old fashion, they still work. And it’s important that kids have role models encouraging, and showing them the importance of reading a book,” Mondo said.

Books 4 Buddies has give-away for students at LMHA Weiler Homes | The Toledo Journal
Dr. Romules Durant, superintendent for Toledo Public Schools, and Laneta Goings, founder/president of Books 4 Buddies discuss ways of encouraging children to read during the summer months.

Jordan Topoleski, 18, is also an Ambassador for Books 4 Buddies. He said that, many people may not have the resources to buy and keep books in their homes; therefore, their effort helps fill a much needed void.

“Over the years since I’ve been in the program, I’ve got a better perspective on the entire city, and not just where I live,” he said.

 

Books 4 Buddies has give-away for students at LMHA Weiler Homes | The Toledo Journal

Joaquin Centron Vega is vice president of assets management for LMHA. He said, “We like to take pride in our community by helping to provide positive things for it, especially for the children.”

“This event encourages kids to read during the summer months,” said Dr. Romules Durant, superintendent for TPS. “We’re always looking for ways to encourage literacy,” he said.

John Gray celebrates 80th birthday

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John Gray celebrates 80th birthday | The Toledo Journal
Celebrating the life of John Gray are, front, from left Trazon Harris, great granddaughter, Natasha Nunn, granddaughter, John Gray, friends, John and Nicole Pullum. Back, left to right are Bobby Nunn Sr. son, Bobby Nunn Jr., grandson, and Jennifer Gray, daughter.

By Jurry Taalib-Deen
Journal Staff Writer

“Everyone wanted to be his child, or grandchild, or nephew, or they want to claim a relationship to him, because he would give you the shirt off his back; that’s how loving my dad is,” Bobby Nunn, Sr. told The Toledo Journal about his father, John Gray.

John Gray celebrates 80th birthday | The Toledo JournalMore accolades were conveyed at the 80th birthday celebration of Mr. Gray on Saturday, September 15. Held at Calvary Bible Chapel, 3740 West Alexis, his birthday wasn’t until November 30, but Mr. Nunn said they wanted to hold it earlier, in order to give family from out of town the opportunity to attend, while the weather was nice.

From Indiana, Tennessee, Illinois, and Wisconsin, love ones traveled to celebrate the life of their beloved.

The father of four children, Dorothy Gray, Jennifer Gray, Robin Nunn and Bobby Nunn Sr., and a host of grandchildren, and great grandchildren, Mr. Gray retired in 2004 after serving 28 years as a Deputy Sheriff, and is an active member of Jerusalem Baptist Church.

On why her father is deserving of the party, Robin Nunn said, “Regardless of how many times we, his children, failed him, or let him down, he never turned his back on us. He would simply say, ‘Maybe that particular thing isn’t for you; let’s try something else;’ now that’s real love.”

“I love this party,” Mr. Gray said. “My family told me to expect a lot of people, and sure enough, a lot of people came. Normally, when you hear, expect a lot of people, a lot of people don’t show up, but they did today, and that made me feel loved.”

John Gray celebrates 80th birthday | The Toledo Journal

The only thing he said he wanted for his birthday was to still be in good health.

“The feeling of being loved, like I am by my family, is a good feeling that everyone needs to experience” Mr. Gray said.

Race for the Cure

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Race for the Cure | The Toledo Journal

By Michelle Martin
Journal Staff Writer

One in eight women are affected by breast cancer and five of these affected women will pass away each week. African American women are also 40 percent more likely to die from breast cancer, according to the American Cancer Society.

Race for the Cure_Brown-Mickels Family | The Toledo Journal
Brown-Mickels Family

While these numbers may be frightening, there is still hope. Susan G. Komen of Northwest Ohio has donated over $17 million to breast cancer research and local services, providing for thousands of local women. Twenty five percent of the collected donations are donated to cancer research, while 75 percent supports breast cancer awareness and preparedness in Northwest Ohio.

Race for the Cure FI_Aerobic Exercise encouragement | The Toledo Journal
Aerobic Exercise encouragement with Erika White
Race for the Cure_Children of the community volunteer | The Toledo Journal
Children of the community volunteer during the event.

This year, thousands gathered at the 25th annual Toledo Race for the Cure Sept. 30 in downtown Toledo. The event is held to raise breast cancer awareness and to celebrate survivors.

The 2018 race specifically honored survivor Rena Raga and the memory of Kelli Andres, wife and mother, who passed away this year.

Race for the Cure | The Toledo JournalThe day's events included a Kid Zone at Fifth Third Field, a Survivor Parade, and a survivor ribbon photo taken with a flying drone. New this year was a survivor’s trolley that transported those who could not participate in the race.

About 20,000 people came to walk, run, volunteer, or watch the race which continues to support the foundation's $1 million fundraising goal each year.

That goal is well on its way to being reached, considering the 10,000 paid participants as well as a $55,000 donation from Ford Motor Company towards the continued research for the cure.

International Human Trafficking Conference exposes, fights the dark world of sex trade

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International Human Trafficking Conference | The Toledo Journal
Dr. Celia Williamson, left, director of the Lucas County Human Trafficking Coalition, talks to conference attendees, Dr. Jesse Bach, and Lisa Belton.

By Jurry Taalib-Deen
Journal Staff Writer

“Purchasing someone online, from the dark web, for sex trafficking, is as easy as buying a pizza,” Dr. Jesse Bach, of Cleveland State University, told The Toledo Journal. Dr. Bach, on long with numerous professionals from around the world, presented their research about Human Trafficking, and how to combat it, during a two day conference, held on Thursday, September 20, and Friday, September 21, in the University of Toledo’s, Lancelot Thompson, Student Union.

Over 100 workshops were conducted addressing issues either, indigenous to Toledo, and the United States, or more specifically, in countries such as India, or on the continents of Europe, and Africa.

Several workshop topics were, “Romance and Manipulation,” “Characteristics of Federal Offenders Sentenced for Child Molestation and Sentencing Outcomes,” “Early Childhood Sexual Abuse and Foster Care: A Survivors Perspective,” and “Parents as Perpetrators: Intergenerational Sex Trafficking in Rural India.”

Dr. Celia Williamson, director of the Lucas County Human Traffic Coalition said the ripple effect of the conference has been felt around the world. Laws have been enacted, task forces developed, and programs put into place to help victims, and apprehend perpetrators. One of her goals, she said, is to live stream the conference in parts of the world, such as Africa, that’s plagued with human trafficking,

On the topic of the local Pastors accused of human trafficking, Dr. Williamson said, some church members seem to be more concerned with how the girls, who were trafficked, contributed to their situation, as opposed to the fact that Pastors were involved with underage girls for the sex trade.

“No matter what, the lives of the children come first. If the Pastors are found guilty, some can pray that their souls go to heaven, but their asses are going to jail,” she said.

Motivated by the fact that her stepfather was a human trafficker, was a social worker who, asked that her identity be kept anonymous. She said she grew up watching her stepdad manipulate, and abuse her mom. She learned first-hand the tactics, and language used by perpetrators of human trafficking.

“Traffickers will say things such as, ‘No one else will take care of you, or your daughter, but me.’ Traffickers will also become the main supplier of toys, school supplies, and other things, in a child’s life, in order to keep the mom dependent, and loyal to him.”

Dr. Tyffani Manford Dent, a licensed psychologist, has been working in the field of sex trafficking for over 20 years, conducted a workshop on, “Not #MeToo: How Gender-based Work and Micro/Macro-aggressions Impede Trafficking Survivors of Color from Accessing Services.”

International Human Trafficking Conference | The Toledo Journal
Dr. Tyffani Manford-Dent explains how the #MeToo movement has intentionally neglected African American women who are victims of sex crimes.

She explained that, although the #MeToo movement was developed by an African American woman, for African American women, once it went nationally, and accepted by white women, African American women haven’t gained the benefits of it.

Dr. Manford-Dent said the services, and benefits that have come about, due to the movement, have been geared toward white women.

Counseling, and other services for the victims of any type of sexual crime, has been established in white suburban areas. Even those who work in the field are recruited from white suburban areas, Dr. Manford-Dent said.

“Sadly, some survivors lives, white suburban women, are more valued then African American women who are survivors of sex crimes; which is all deliberate,” she said.

“The first step at resolving this problem is recognizing it exist; only then can we move forward to resolution,” Dr. Manford-Dent said.

Second Baptist celebrates 10th Pastoral anniversary

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Second Baptist celebrates 10th Pastoral anniversary | The Toledo Journal
The Pastors and First Ladies in attendance for the afternoon service. From left are Pastor Randall, and First Lady Wanda Carter, Pastor Tim, and First Lady Felisha Pettaway, Dr. Jerry, and First Lady Debra Boose, and Pastor Michael and First Lady Sabrina Prince.

Second Baptist Church, located at 9300 Western Maumee Road in Monclova, Ohio celebrated the 10th Pastoral anniversary of their leadership, Dr. Jerry and First Lady Debra Boose. Held on Sunday, September 23 at their church, visitors from other religious communities, as well as leadership from the political community were in attendance.

Second Baptist celebrates 10th Pastoral anniversary | The Toledo Journal
Members of the anniversary committee present Dr. Jerry and First Lady Debra Boose with an all-expense paid cruise.

Divided in two services, Dr. Nathan Prochere of Tree of Life Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan, delivered the word for the morning service, while Pastor Tm Pettaway of Walk the Word Ministries, located in Toledo, delivered the afternoon service.

Proclamations from political leadership, tokens of love from the religious community, and an all-expense paid cruise, from the members of Second Baptist Church, were amongst the many gifts presented.

Second Baptist celebrates 10th Pastoral anniversary | The Toledo Journal
The community partners that have helped Second Baptist over the years

And although the day was about the leadership of Second Baptist Church, Dr. and First Lady Boose, made sure many of the guests, as well as the members of the church, received gifts as well.

Kaye Williams, chairperson for the 10th Pastoral anniversary explained to The Toledo Journal why Dr. and First Lady Boose were deserving of the celebration, and gifts.

She said that, when we first started out, the church was located in a small building. Over the years membership began to grow, and to accommodate that growth, a church, with 10 ½ acres was purchased.

“Dr. Boose has taught that the ministry of Christ should be delivered outside the walls of the church,” she said. “He has been instrumental in a lot of community programs throughout the area, including job readiness programs, working with those with drug and alcohol addiction, and feeding the homeless. He’s an example for both the religious and secular community,” Mrs. Williams explained.

And unlike many wives of a Pastor, First Lady Boose recently returned to the work force. Between her duties at the church, and at her place of employment, she said she’s in a better position to serve the community.

“I’m able to see the struggles, as well as the character of this new generation. There’s a greater need to minister to them, and show that many of the things they engage in, and consider cool, aren’t beneficial for them,” she said.

“Today has been very beautiful. I’m proud of the leadership in the church for making it a success,” Dr. Boose told the congregation.

The retired fireman, who served his community for 30 years, still finds time to give back.

“I still work because Jesus said make disciples. I’m supposed to work, and educate the people on who they really are. Part of my mandate is to show them how to take back what they enemy has taken from them,” Dr. Boose said.

AOA Senior Safari at Toledo Zoo

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AOA Senior Safari at Toledo Zoo | The Toledo Journal

By Jurry Taalib-Deen
Journal Staff Writer

For 25 years, the Area Office on Aging, AOA, along with their community partners, have been hosting the Senior Safari at the Toledo Zoo. Encouraging a healthy lifestyle, while re-visiting the zoo, all in an entertaining environment is the purpose of the event. But for 2018, participants received much more when the entertainment on Tuesday, September 18, was Motown’s The Vandellas.

AOA Senior Safari at Toledo Zoo | The Toledo Journal
Billie Johnson, President/CEO of AOA, welcomes the seniors to the event, while Jerry Anderson, retired media personality, and the Master of Ceremony, looks on.

Before being entertained by the legends of Motown, Billie Johnson, President/CEO of AOA, told The Toledo Journal that attendees were first, encouraged to participate in a one mile walk around the zoo. September is “Falls Prevention Month,” she said, and the walk is to bring awareness to falls, and ways to prevent them. Also, the walk encouraged exercising, as one of the ways to help build muscle, and bone, both of which, could help decrease the chances of falling.

“We’re hoping those who participate in the walk, each take at least 10,000 steps today,” Mrs. Johnson said. “One of our partners, Silver Sneakers, donated 100 pedometers, so seniors can keep track of their steps,” she said.

Sarah Vandevender, a pharmacist, said, various things can contribute to falls, such as dizziness. Some medications, as well as having low sodium, and potassium, could increase the chances of falling. Low magnesium, she said, could lead to muscle cramps, which could also increase the chances of falling.

AOA Senior Safari at Toledo Zoo | The Toledo Journal
Pete Peterson rolled the dice to see what exercise he had to do. Lunges weren’t a problem for him, being that he works out regularly.

“Always, speak to your pharmacist, or primary care physician, first, about taking preventive measures,” she said.

Following the one mile walk, Silver Sneakers, had four stations set up along the route to the Malawi Event Center, where vendors, lunch, and the performance by The Vandellas would take place. At each station, seniors would roll large dice that had six different exercises on each side. Jumping jacks, lunges, and leg lifts, were among some of the exercises that participants were encourage to do. Every senior that participated in an exercise, at each station, would receive a free gift.

AOA Senior Safari at Toledo Zoo | The Toledo Journal
The Vandellas made their way through the crowd, people stood up and danced, including Billie Johnson, President/CEO of AOA, seen on the left.

Once inside the Malawi Center, numerous vendors focusing on healthy lifestyle, or services offered to seniors, passed out information about what they offered, gave health screenings, or distributed free fruit.

After a healthy lunch, attendees were treated to 30 minute performance by The Vandellas, in which many seniors could be seen dancing to the group’s songs.

AOA Senior Safari at Toledo Zoo | The Toledo Journal
Lucy Mayer had to get a dance in with the Vandellas.

At the entrance into the zoo, seniors prepare for their one mile walk. The goal of the day was each walker tries to reach 10,000 steps.

Dorr St. Live documenting, revitalizing the inner city

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Dorr St Live 2018 | The Toledo Journal
People brought their folding chairs, and just enjoyed the day’s festivities that carried on into the early evening.

By Journal Staff Writer

The fourth annual, Dorr St. Live was held on Saturday, August 25, at the corner of Dorr, and Collingwood. According to the sponsoring agent, the African American Legacy Project,  said it has a mission to document the history of the area, and help revitalize a once, financially lucrative community.

Local entertainment and some from out of town, kept a crowd that, brought their folding chairs to the event, and sat right in the grass, entertained throughout the day.

Dorr St Live 2018 | The Toledo Journal
Ronald Jacobs Bay, and Linda Johnson, didn’t know each other, but that didn’t stop them from sharing a dance together.

Food trucks, owned by African Americans, lined Dorr St. to satisfy the hunger needs of those in attendance.

Vendors selling products from fragrances, to unique purses were also on hand.

Dorr St Live 2018 | The Toledo Journal

A large wooden board sat in the middle of the grass, and was decorated with African American newspapers from far back as the 1940s.

For Robert Smith, director of the African American Legacy Project, this is all just the beginning of a larger scheme he wants to see come into existence.

“This event is not just about having a good time, it’s about documenting our rich history, and helping to revitalize this community,” he told The Toledo Journal.

Partnering with Lucas County Metropolitan Housing, LMHA, the African American Legacy Project, is documenting the life stories of some of those people who grew up in the neighboring housing projects of the Port Lawrence, Brand Whitlocks, McClinton Nuns, and Albertus Browns, and were successful in life.

People such as Frank Goldie, who grew up in the Port Lawrence, and became NW Ohio’s first African American Post Master General, would later become the Post Master General of Chicago.

Dorr St Live 2018 | The Toledo Journal
Liz Watson, volunteer, officiates a game of Connect Four between Mesih Glover, right, and Aaun Scott.

Katie Bonds, senior vice president of operations at LMHA said, “It’s important for Toledo to know their history. It’s also important for those who are growing up in those projects to know the success stories of those who came before them; it serves as inspiration.”