71.9 F
Toledo
Wednesday, June 19, 2019
Home Events

Events

Twenty three “Silent Soldiers” honored at Black History Celebration

0
The Silent Soldiers The Toledo Journal

Mt. Nebo Missionary Baptist Church, under the guidance of Dr. Cedric Brock, held its 18th annual Black History Celebration banquet last Sunday, March 3, 2019 at the Premiere Banquet Complex and honored, the “Silent Soldiers”. These are those who have been selected as accomplishing, so much, behind the scenes. This year almost 600 people attended the event hosted by the Mt. Nebo’s Voice of Hope Outreach Ministry as they celebrated the theme of “Stepping out In Faith.”.

Dr. Cedric Brock and Larry Jones, of Indiana was the
master of ceremonies.

After the introduction of this year’s honorees, from Deacon Alan Crawford, the church’s First Lady, Debra Brock, performed a musical selection. The many sponsors were thanked and then Nicolle Brown offered a special presentation as Nikketa Sugarfoot.

The Youth Ministry performed following dinner and then Sister Geraldine of St. Paul AME Zion Church made the presentation of honorees which are as follows:  Dr. Karen Adams-Ferguson, MD; Barbara Allison; Marcella Cook,; Collette Crosby; Barbara Crowell; Mary Dunning; Michelle Furr; Chris Gayle; Vickie Green-Horsley; Julia Holt; Michael Key; Laverne Knighten; Levon Rayford; Freddie Roberson; Lorena Roberts; Carolyn Robinson; Gertrude Robinson; Sharisse Rowell; Edward Sanders; Norma Savage; Adrian Thomas; Rita Winfree and Alberta Witcher.

Dr. Cedric Brock and First Lady Debra Brock of Mt. Nebo Missionary Baptist Church.

This annual event started as a dinner held in the church dining area, 18 years ago, with an attendance of about 150 people. It rapidly out grew that space and has been held in much larger banquet rooms for more than a decade.

Dr. Brock said, “We celebrate the “Silent Soldiers” who have been faithful to the community at large. We give them their flowers while they can smell them.” The Voice of Hope Outreach Ministry is the brainchild of Dr. Brock who sponsors the banquet to honor the unsung heroes of the city and surrounding communities. Throughout the years, the ministry has sponsored a number of community services, such as: Radio Outreach (1520 AM and 95.7 FM); Adopt A Haircut Ministries at Poor Clark’s Barbershop; Adopt A Belt Outreach; Coat Give-Away; Good Friday Ham Give-Away; Back To School Give-Away and Weekly Broadcast NOW Network.

The master of ceremonies for this year’s event was conducted by Larry Jones of Indiana Avenue MBC.

Indiana Missionary Baptist Church celebrates the 73rd Anniversary

0
Indiana Missionary Baptist Church celebrates the 73rd Anniversary The Toledo Journal

By Michael Daniels
Journal Staff Reporter

For two Sundays in a row, February 17 and 24th, Indiana Missionary Baptist Church celebrated its 73rd Anniversary with an afternoon service at the church. On the 17th, Rev. Dr. Jerry Boose from Second Baptist church was the main speaker. On the 24th, Rev. Dr. Willie Perryman from Jerusalem Baptist Church did the honors. Both ministers brought members of their congregations, as well as, their church choirs to join in on the celebration.

The theme of this year’s program was from Philippians 4:6, “Don’t worry about anything, Instead Pray about everything,” This theme was most appropriate because it reaches back to Indiana Missionary Baptist Churches humble beginnings.

It was in the mid-forties when Rev. W. J. Stephenson, the pastor of Central Baptist Church in north Toledo realized that his church was going to lose its property due to an upcoming freeway project that was going to slice through the heart of north Toledo. He became worried that many of his parishioners that lived in the central city would have a difficult time getting to church after the expressway was built.

Faced with this dilemma, Rev. Stephenson did what a man of God should do! He turned to his Heavenly Father for help, and his help came. Inspired by the Holy Spirit, he decided to resign his position as pastor of Central Baptist and open a new church in the central city where the majority of African Americans lived during that time period. He then contacted a fellow pastor, the Rev. E. J. Benton along with some established church Deacons, Trustee, pastors, church Mothers and other church-going people for a meeting.

At this meeting which took place on February 20, 1946, at 819 Ewing Street in the central city, Indiana Missionary Baptist Church was officially organized and Rev. W. J. Stephenson became the church’s first pastor. This was a position he would maintain until he passed away in July of 1959. Also present at this meeting were a group of teenagers, and unbeknownst to everyone at the time in this group, was one who was the new church’s hope of the future. A young man by the name of John E. Roberts who was there that night, would grow up, and one day become one of Indiana’s most influential and beloved ministers.

As the new church progressed it quickly began to grow and it wasn’t too long before everyone became aware that they were going need a larger space to properly worship the Lord. Now they had a mission fulfill. So, they started a building fund to build a new church building. Soon enough money was raised to purchase a property at 640 Indiana Ave. 

Missionary Baptist Church celebrated a mission fulfilled as they marched singing God’s praises all the way from the old building on Ewing Street to the new one on Indiana Avenue. Since that time the congregation has continued to grow and so has the original structure. In time came the addition of a ground level sanctuary, the upper-level sanctuary, the Stephenson-Roberts Hall and a spacious parking lot to accommodate its large growing congregation.

Since the passing of the founder, Rev. W. J. Stephenson in 1959, the church has had several pastors including the Rev. T. Wiggins in 1960, and the Rev. F. H. Alexander 1961 through 1963.

On January 21, 1965, the young teenager, who attended that first organizational meeting in 1946, the Rev. John E. Roberts became Indiana’s fourth pastor. He later elevated his status in ministry by graduating from the Toledo Bible College in 1975 and was Valedictorian of his class. From this point on he became known as Rev. Dr. John E. Roberts.

Under his leadership, Indiana Missionary Baptist Church has become one of the most influential churches in the city. They are known for their community involvement for reaching out and helping others.

As for Pastor Roberts, he is a minister who lives his ministry, 24 hours a day, in and out of the pulpit. If you meet him out in the world, he’s probably going to ask you two questions. One, ‘your name,’ and two, “are you saved’? He’s a man who understands that his main purpose in life is to help us ordinary folks find out way into God’s grace and into his heaven.

At his church, he is a continual inspiration to others and has also mentored dozens of young men in the field of ministry, many who have gone on to have their own churches.

As the church celebrates its 73rd anniversary, he had these words of divine wisdom for his congregation, he said, “Truly God has blessed us and smiled upon us, and I thank Him for it. We must never forget that Central Baptist gave birth to Indiana. Thank God for Rev. W. J. Stephenson and the pioneers like him that were with him paving the way. We must constantly pray for our church and its ministry of redemption in a lost world as we constantly live our lives in a way that honors Christ and his teaching.”

Catholic Diocese of Toledo Black Ministries celebrates Black History bestowing Drum Major Awards

0
Catholic Diocese of Toledo Black Ministries celebrates Black History bestowing Drum Major Awards
Bishop Daniel E. Thomas (center) Bestows Drum Major Awards to the following nominates (L-R) Vivian Johnson, Malachi Wayne Wyse, Devon Williams and Dr. Helen C. Cooks.

On February 23, Bishop Daniel E. Thomas of the Catholic Diocese of Toledo celebrated a mass for promoting harmony, as our nation celebrates Black History Month. The highlight of the event, which took place at Our Lady, Queen of the Most Holy Rosary Cathedral on Collingwood Blvd., was the presentation of the Catholic Diocese of Toledo Black Ministry’s Drum Major Award to four outstanding citizens.

Inspiration for this award came from the work Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’ did in his lifetime to promote harmony and justice in the world. The name of the award itself comes from a speech Dr. King’s made where he said, ‘I am a drum major for the peace and justice’. The criterias for receiving this award are also based on the values of Dr. King life and this speech.

This year’s award recipients were Dr. Helen C. Cooks, Vivian Johnson, along with and two students, Devon Williams and Malachi Wayne Wyse.

Dr. Cook is best known for her work as an educator, a graduate of Scott High School and The University of Toledo where she received her Undergraduate, Masters and Doctoral degrees. She has impacted the lives of thousands of students through the Toledo Excel Program at the University of Toledo. This scholarship program is her crowning achievement.

Upon receiving her award Dr. Cook said, ‘This is the second Drum Major Award I received this year and I am proud to have received these awards. Dr. King was the drum major and the person of our time, and he still is today. It’s an honor to receive an award in his name.”

She added, “The work that I’ve done is about justice and peace and for that I’m very proud. They say he kept up trouble and they say I keep up trouble, and on that accord, we have something on common. To the young people of today I say be prepared for that which is coming ahead. The road is not easy, but the road is worthwhile, let God order your footsteps and you will make it.”

Also honored was Vivian Johnson is a lay leader at St. Martin de Porres Catholic Church here in Toledo. She has served with dedication and grace for many years as chairperson of St. Martin’s Evangelization Ministry. Other ministries that she participates in are Liturgy and Consolation as well as being a Eucharistic Minister and Lector. Her prayer ministry for those who are imprisoned touch all who have been impacted by a loved one’s imprisonment.

She leads by example and is a role model to many. Her service to the church and her impact on the younger generation is immeasurable.

Davion Williams, a well-rounded honor student, has impacted his St. John’s High School community through his leadership in the school’s Social Justice Alliance, where he helps raise awareness on subjects such as housing inequality and gentrification. His activism for social causes includes his participation in the 2018 Washington D. C, “March for Our Lives” His service for credit hours include serving food to those in need, volunteering in a nursing home and participating in an Appalachian Immersion project in West Virginia where helped to run a camp for youth. He is also a talented
composer of hop music.

Malachi Wayne Wyse is known for seeing the good in people and brings the best out in others. He prioritizes relationships, scholastic achievements and downplays his prowess in athletics. His character and personality marked him early as a youth with potential for leadership; leading to his selection to attend Salesian Leadership Camp. He is described humble, but his vibrant personality is brought to bear on everything he touches, including mock trial participation, performing in student musical productions, the Afro Club, Asian Culture Club and campus ministry. He fulfills his service credit responsibilities and for two years has served as a camp counselor for
incoming St. Francis de Sales High School students, where he is also the senior class president.

The Drum Major Awards are given out every year, if you know someone who you think is worthy of such an honor, call Ellen Jones at the Catholic Diocese of Toledo for further instructions on the nomination process.

Twenty five under 45 receive “Black Lives Matter” Awards

0
CSRN members at the Black Lives Matter Awards are (back L-R) Kwinlyn Tyler, Hadgu Hadgn, Gwen Wilson, Brother Washington Mohammad, Vanessa Avery, Brittany Moore, Ruth Leonard, and Julian Mack, (front L-R) Jodie Summers, Connor Kelly, Myriesha Barber and Gina Frye.

Last Saturday, February 23, 2019, the Community Solidarity Responses Network (CSRN) presented the “Black Lives Matter Awards at the Fredrick Douglass Center. With a theme titled, “25 under 45”, the group celebrated 25 African Americans members of the Toledo community under the age of 45, who are working to improve Toledo’s communities.

Janece Wooley, The Interim Executive Director of the Fredrick Douglass Community Center welcome audience to the Black Lives Matter Awards.

CSRN member Julian Mack said, “We are having this program tonight because it’s important that we reaffirm the positive things that are being done in the community. We want to encourage the younger people in the next generation that’s coming up to continue to do the right thing. Often times, we only hear about the negative things that are going on. When in reality there’s plenty of positive things happening as well.”

Mr. Mack continued by explaining, “We want to reaffirm and lift up those who are doing positive things so that can continue to happen. We want to let them know and recognize them for their efforts, so that more people will hopefully decide, to do the right thing.”

The 25 awardee recipients, were Dave Ross, Danny Ricardi, Timothy V. Pettaway, Patrice McClellen, Keisha Snow-Veley, RaShya Ghee, Leigh Utley, Tiara Armstrong, Lonnie Ghee, Sheena Barnes, Nia Snelling, Veralucia Mendoza, Khadirah Muhammad, Rob Pasker, Lance Self, Mike Rob, Marcus Boyd, Tina Butts, Derrick Brooks, Terrence Pounds Sr., Kwilyn Tyler, Blair Johnson, Montrice Terry, Zia Cooke and Tony Barnes.

Awardees (left to right) Lance Self, Khadirah Muhammad, Timothy V. Pettaway Jr, RaShya Ghee, Terrence Pounds Sr., Blair Johnson, Tiara Armstrong, Montrice Terry, and Dave Ross.

Brother Washington Mohammad, one of the founding members of CSRN added, “We had this program because, we wanted to highlight just some ordinary people in our community, doing some extraordinary things. A lot of people may not have heard of these young men and woman, who are doing wonderful things, so it’s up to us to lift each other up.”

The Black Lives Matter social movement materialized out of a community need, and is today’s core civil rights movement. Just like the original civil rights movement, Black Lives Matter has put a national spotlight on an injustice, and by doing so has somewhat reduced the problem.

When asked where did CSRN come from, CSRN member Ruth Leonard replied, ”The Black Lives Matter movement in Toledo started after the lack of conviction in the case of Michael Brown. After which people in the city were looking for a way to uplift each other and out of that effort the Community Solidarity Responses Network came in to existence.

The Community Solidarity Responses Network meets every Tuesday at 7:30 pm at the Paul-win Center at 1416 Nebraska Ave.

They also may be contacted through the following methods:
Community Solidarity Response Network of Toledo
Phone 419-329-8177
csrntoledo@gmail.com
1416 Nebraska Ave
Toledo, OH 43607

Facebook: Community Solidarity Response Network of Toledo, Instagram: CSRNToledo,YouTube: Community Solidarity Response Network of Toledo, Twitter: @CSRN Toledo, and Gmail: csrntoledo@gmail.com

UT Excel sponsors 35th Annual Conference For Aspirating Minority Youth

By Michael Daniels
Journal Staff Reporter

On January 26, The University of Toledo’s office of Toledo Excel and the UT Joint Committee presented the 35th Annual Conference for Aspirating Minority Youth. This year’s theme was, ‘Onward and Upward, Persisting Through Barriers and Obstacles’.

Indeed, a fitting topic for the ambitious minority youth of today. Like most of us, when we dream our dreams, we only dream the good things. We never imagine something bad might happen, or something or someone may try to stand in our way. For many this is knowledge that only comes with age and experience.

This year’s conference sought to give the young folks a heads up, as well as, solutions to the problems they might face as they venture into the world to pursue their goals in life. Understanding that those situations which seem impossible to solve at the time and try to block your way can be overcome with persistence and sheer determination is valuable knowledge. Knowing these facts and other methods of survival is definitely an advantage in life and that was the message of the day.

Keynote speaker, Dr. Terrell Strayhorn drove this messages home even more during his address, telling the students, “You must learn how to persist. Persisting requires us as aspirating minority youths to be willing to change and adjust to our environment. You must persist through barriers.”

Adding, “Someday you will encounter something or someone, who tries to keep from reaching your goals. You must understand that you must not let anything or anyone come in between you and that, which you are designed to do. Persist through the barrier and discover your why. Why you are here and what you are designed for and find your inner light. As we pursue our greatness in the face obstacles and barriers never forget that deep inside if us there is a light that will always be there, and even in our darkest hour we must turn inside and connect with that light and let that light shine,” he said.

Dr. Strayhorn is the Founding Chief Executive Officer of, ‘Do Good Works Educational Consulting LLS’. He has written over 10 books and is internationally recognized as a student success scholar and the foremost authority on issues of equity and diversity.

Following Dr. Strayhorn, in the second session of the program, was speaker and UT graduate Christopher Scott who showcased his new book, “7 Secrets to Surviving College.” Mr. Scott who has a Masters of Education Degree said, ‘I’m here today to uplift and teach our high school and college bound students the 7 secrets that it takes to navigate college and be successful in this world. I say take no losses in life. Mr. Scott is the founder of Reach to Teach National, an organization that provides motivational service to youth across the country.

An estimated crowd of over 350, seventh through 12th grade students, parents and members of the community attended this annual free event.

Knowing that his students would benefit from the Excel program, Dr. Romulus Durant, Toledo Public Schools (TPS) superintendent, brought students from his TPS program called, ‘Young Men and Young Women of Excellence,’ a peer to peer mentorship group.

Dr. Durant said, “I try to get our students involved in community activities so they can become a part of the community, and one day contribute even more to the community as an adult. We want our youths as well as all youths to continue to aspire. We are TPS proud and very excited to be here today.”

Toledo Excel was established in 1988 and is a community project bringing various groups together for a common purpose. That purpose is to help underrepresented students including African, Asian, Hispanic and Native Americans go to college, be successful there and graduate.

Director of Toledo Excel is David Young

The first Annual Conference for Aspirating Minority Youth was held in 1985 and continues to grow in popularity ever since.

The current Director of Toledo Excel is David Young.

Center of Hope Family Services Hosts its 2nd Annual Peace on Earth Event for the Community

0
Center of Hope Family Services Hosts its 2nd Annual Peace on Earth Event thetoledojournal.com

Special to The Toledo Journal

On Thursday, December 20th, 2018, Center of Hope Family Services hosted its 2nd Annual Peace on Earth Holiday event. Sponsors included the William Vaughan Company, Apple Inc., and State Bank. “Peace on Earth is our way of letting families and the community know that we are thinking of them during the holidays,” states Dr. Tracee Perryman, CEO. “Our event is welcoming of diverse cultural holiday traditions, hoping that Peace on Earth is of value to all of us. The holiday season can be a joyous time, but it isn’t necessarily joyous for everyone. Each year, we at Center of Hope strive to bring the community together in unity and solidarity. We create a safe, supportive, warm, welcoming space to let our families and community know that we care about them.”

It seems that message is resonating with the community. The 2018 Peace on Earth attendance doubled from the year before, with about 300 guests partying to festive music. The Lucas County Juvenile Court Lobby was transformed into a “Winter Wonderland” to foster joy, hope, and holiday cheer. Children and families were able to participate in an array of activities. Lucas County Juvenile Court provided craft stations, cookie decorating, and an opportunity for each child to take pictures with Santa Claus. Center of Hope hosted a gift giveaway for all children ages 0-14.

Midway through the program, the crowd paused to honor seven of its Parent Support Program participants. These individuals were recognized for graduating from Center of Hope’s Parent Education Program during the month of December. Others were honored for maintaining employment for 90 days or more through Center of Hope’s workforce development program.

The Central Catholic High School Glee club provided live entertainment, followed by Dr. Tracee Perryman. The Center of Hope ELEVATE program, winners of both the 2018 Ohio Department of Education 21st Century Literacy Achievement, and Excellence and Innovation Awards, performed the finale. The ELEVATE students performed their signature song, “ELEVATE,” which they recorded this summer, and is now available on Soundcloud. Center of Hope concluded the program by sponsored a sit-down community dinner for all guests. For more information about Center of Hope Family Services or its programs, visit www.cohfs.org.

2018 Kwanzaa Celebration held at the Fredrick Douglass Community Center

0

Special to the Journal by Michael Daniels

After the traditional Christmas holiday ends, many African Americans observe another celebration known as Kwanzaa. A Swahili phrase which means ‘first’ and signifies the first fruit of the harvest. Kwanzaa begins on December 26 and last for seven days ending on January 1, and is based on seven core principals.

These principals are Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulla (Self Determination), Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility) Ujmaa (Cooperative Economics), Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity) and Imani (Faith). These ideals are observed one at a time on each day of the Kwanzaa season in the order listed by the lighting of a candle each day in the Kinara, a stand which holds the seven candles. This is followed by other Kwanzaa related traditions.

Here in Toledo on the first day of the celebration, December 26, 2018. The Fredrick Douglass Center hosted this yearly activity with a community Kwanzaa event. Organized by the Toledo Kwanzaa House Committee, the event lasted for four day instead of seven do to the venue’s availability. Despite its condensed form the program still offered Toledo’s African American community as well as others the opportunity to celebrate Kwanzaa in grand style.

Squeezed into a shorter time period than normal, the four programs covered two core principals with the lighting of two Kwanzaa candles each day. Ending with the last principal and last candle on the final day.

Day one’s opening ceremony was hosted by Master of Ceremony Rodney Gordon Jr. of the Toledo Kwanzaa House Committee, and featured inspirational speakers, traditional African dance performances, audience participation events, community vendors, and food samples.

One of the highlights of the was guest speaker Mrs. Joyce Stubblefield, who educated and amused everyone as she explained the history of collard greens, an African American food staple. ‘Slaves were not given meats very often so they ate vegetables instead’, she said, ‘and they invented different and creative ways to prepare these items’. She introduced the audience to such ideas as the collard greens sandwich, Egg rolls and even brownies, along with many other ways to prepare this favorite vegetable. She also brought along samples of her collard greens specialties for everyone to taste.

Another outstanding speaker was from The Toledo Kwanzaa House Committee and went by the self-proclaimed name of ‘Kewate’, he spoke on the second principal of Kwanzaa urging the audience to, ‘figure out who you are and be able to discern what is true and what is not true. You are not who society says you are and everything you see, hear or read is not true. If you want to know the truth read the Bible’, he said ‘there you will find the real truth and discover who you are’.

The program also included the singing of the Black National Anthem, a Recognition of the Elders, an Ancestral Roll Call, as well as several other traditional Kwanzaa customs.

Today’s local Kwanzaa celebration evolved from a small and humble beginning back in 1967 in the house of Diane Gordon: Coordinator of the Kwanzaa House Committee. ‘I started celebrating Kwanzaa with my family first,’ she said, ‘and then others soon joined in with us and it has grown from there to what it is today. Eventually the celebration got too big for my house so we moved it to the Grace Community Center’.

This move however would not be the last. Over and over again as the crowds continued to swell the committee was forces to find larger and larger spaces for the growing audience. Finally, the group ended up at The Douglass Center in the heart of the African American community. A place that has enough room to accommodate the ever-growing audience and all the other activities associated with a true Kwanzaa celebration.

When asked, why is Kwanzaa important and what is the attraction, Diane Gordon said, ‘ Kwanzaa teaches us about our true culture and the importance of our culture. We are a family orientated people of faith and we need to learn our true history. If you know your history you won’t make the same mistake in life. It also instills in us the importance of self-respect and respect for our others. If you understand the principals of Kwanzaa you can utilize them every day and throughout the rest of our life. Kwanzaa inspires us to unite and come together as a people and build a better community. If we adhere to the principals of Kwanzaa, we will have a better way of life because these principals teach us how we should live’.

Kwanzaa was originally conceived during the African American re-identification period of the racially turbulent sixties in 1966. This unique African Americans festival of life and spirit realized it’s 52 year of existence in 2018, and has established its place in the world as a legitimate cultural tradition.

Janece Wooley, the Interim Executive Director of the Fredrick Douglass Community Associations said of the events, ‘we are excited to embark on 100 years of service to this community, and we want to continue to be the epicenter for hope and encouragement. We are very happy and proud that The Toledo Kwanzaa House has chosen us to be bless with this wonderful Kwanzaa celebration for the past three years.

Franklin Park spreads holiday cheer, gives coats, groceries and more

0
Franklin Park Holiday Coats The Toledo Journal

By Sean Stewart

A drive through the streets of Northside Toledo on Friday’s mild evening would have usually been like any other, dark and quiet. Though at Word of Faith Ministries on Stickney Ave near Woodward High school, the scene was brought up by a more energetic and cheerful tone.

Cars parked along the street are packed with youth, eager to join in on the affair. Though before they opened the doors to the church, on the corner of Stickney and Russell, they are greeted by a man and a dolly hand truck, packed with items halfway to its top.

The man says with a welcoming yet weighty voice, “watch yourself now, careful”.

The children obey as the man carries past. Though when they enter into the building, the darkness of daylight’s fall resides and the kids embrace the warmth of festivity.They are greeted by smiles, laughs and warmth. Also, by gifts.

Over 120 families gathered to receive donations of coats, gloves, and food boxes December 19th. It is a tradition that has been going on for seven years in which Franklin Park Lincoln car dealership has moved to provide a holiday contribution effort to the community.

Foods like potatoes, apples, whole turkeys and canned goods, along with newly bought winter clothing, were donated to families in need of assistance.

“We try to give back to the community” says event organizer Mike Colbert, who also works with Franklin Park Lincoln.

Families were also welcomed to a hot meal dinner courtesy of community volunteers. On the menu was a generous selection of well prepared chicken breast, fried potatoes, mashed potatoes and gravy, corn and more served with hot chocolate and tea.

“I just love to cook” said Martin McCabe, who cooked and prepared the hot food. He has been with Mr. Colbert in the annual event’s organization since the beginning. “Unfortunately the world’s gonna keep having poor people”.

Aside from the food and winter wear, local barbers and nail stylists also donated their time and skills for good measure. To the tunes of cheerful music, children were able to get their hair cut and shaped up on the church’s stage and nails polished just off to the side.

Franklin Park Holiday Coats The Toledo Journal

“Lots of people hurting” said Rodney Holmes, an elder at Word of Faith who volunteered to help. “This is a gift in and of itself, of giving back. They need help.” Mr. Holmes moves to serve his community in the way he can. As to the vision of Mr. Colbert of Franklin Park, he gives new winter coats to the families of the community, also food by the box.

He does it all with a hearty and welcoming, yet weighty voice. He also does with a dolly, packed halfway to its top.

Sell Out Crowd of Over 750 Attended the Area Office on Aging’s Senior Holiday Party

0
Billie Johnson and Mattie Taylor The Toledo Journal
Billie Johnson and Mattie Taylor

Submitted

Mattie Taylor is seen here with Ms. Billie Johnson, President/CEO of the  Area Office on Aging of Northwestern Ohio, Inc.

This was at their Senior Holiday Party on December 14 at Premier Banquet Center . And, they welcomed over 750 individuals age 60 or better.

Mattie Taylor retired in April, 2018, after 40 plus years, as a Nutrition Site Manager for The Area Office on Aging, and Spencer Valley Senior Nutrition Program.  Mattie Taylor states that, she enjoyed  the Christmas Party, and she will continue to attend all the events that the Area Office on Aging will have for the seniors. Everyone enjoyed a formal sit-down lunch, entertainment from singer Marcia Bowen, DJ One TyMe, the Anthony Wayne High School Choir, and, of course, a visit from Santa Claus.

Lee Johnson, Jr. celebrates birthday with family and friends

0
Lee Johnson Birthday DSC_4136 | The Toledo Journal

On Friday, November 23, 2018, was a day that turned out to be an exciting evening for Lee Johnson, Jr., as he celebrated his birthday with over 40 family and friends, with some coming from out-of-town.

As the youngest and only brother of seven siblings, Lee has five sisters (one is deceased) who celebrated with him and they are Malinda and Yvonne Johnson, Tena Morales, Darlene Booth and Deloris Johnso-Coogler. His cousins, GG and John came from Chicago, Illinois and there were many of his nieces, nephews a great nephew, brother-in-laws, along with a host of other relatives and friends, in attendance.

Although, Mr. Johnson is a Scott High grad, he celebrated his special day with the Libbey all class grads’ annual cabaret in the Garden Lake Banquet Hall. And, as a coincidence, a friend he grew up with, Diane Parker, who attended Libbey, (husband Sylvester) was there and her birthday was on the same day.

Lee said, “I would love to thank my Johnson family, who I was impressed with and friends, plus Francine Coogler-Boyd, for helping me to have a very awesome time and we wish you a Happy Holiday”

As a native of Toledo, Mr. Johnson is a faithful union member of Laborers Local 500.